Category: Recruitment & Training

anigif_enhanced-15690-1394578851-1Who doesn’t like movies like Grease, Terms of Endearement, Tootsie, Clueless, or Men in Black? In fact these movies were the highest grossing movies in their category and are still the most highly rated clips in the media. However, the truth is that all these movies have one fact in common. They all make sexual harassment a joke.

Sexual harassment is, above all, a manifestation of power relations.  Treating sexual harassment is not a matter of one training course, but rather a fundamental shaking up of an individuals perceptions and attitudes about the target of their harassment.  For this reason,  sexual harassment training needs to be embodied within an overall communications training process supported by a ground-up process of inquiry, where the individual perpetrator can realize why they victimize. Without that piece of knowledge, the symptom rather than the actual disease is what gets treated and in fact even it doesn’t.  Because the individual perceives training as a punishment rather than an opportunity for growth.

The Legal Dictionary defines sexual harassment as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that tends to create a hostile or offensive work environment. According to the Unites States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, It is unlawful to harass a person because of that person’s sex. Harassment can include “sexual harassment” or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature. Regardless of the form of sexual harassment, it is illegal to purposefully harass someone at work in order to gain any type of sexual favor. However, many cases remain unreported because of fear of embarrassment or termination.k9563790

There are two types of sexual harassment, Quid Pro Quo and Hostile Environment. Quid Pro Quo Harassment occurs when a manager or supervisor withholds or awards job benefits on the basis of sexual favors. This includes work assignments, hiring, termination, promotions or demotions, positive or negative reviews, or any other job related benefit. On the other hand, if any rewards being withheld because the victim refuses to engage in the sexual favor, the company is would be considered guilty of sexual harassment. Both of these practices although very common in the work place, involve the risk of losing a job and with unemployment rate at a steady 7.4 percent, that isn’t something that most people consider a positive outlook.  Therefore, so many people keep quiet and remain victimized at their place of work.

 

So what is the root cause of sexual harassment, and why is it that it’s so common? From a social psychology perspective, the disconnect is in how people view hostility towards men and women. Research has indicated that stereotypes about socially appropriate gender roles for women and men are a driving factor, while the causes of sexual violence include socioeconomics, anger, power, sadism, sexual pleasure, psychopathology, ethical standards, laws, attitudes toward the victims and evolutionary pressures.

Traditional conceptualizations of sexism have focused almost entirely on overt hostility toward women. While historians, anthropologists, feminist scholars, and psychologists have previously suggested that sexism involves positive and negative evaluations of women.

Ambivalent sexism is a theoretical framework which posits that sexism has two sub-components: “hostile sexism” and “benevolent sexism”. Hostile sexism reflects overtly negative evaluations and stereotypes about a gender (e.g., the ideas that women are incompetent and inferior to men). Benevolent sexism represents evaluations of gender that may appear subjectively positive (subjective to the person who is evaluating), but are actually damaging to people and gender equity more broadly (e.g., the ideas that women need to be protected by men).

Besides Television programming, another cause and arena leading to the rise of sexual harassment is on-line and gaming. There is no shortage of examples of harassment online, a Pew Survey published this week is the first of its kind to drill down into the level and types of online harassment. The report, which polled almost 3,000 Internet users, brings to light that women for the most part have it worse off than men, while most people don’t realize it.  Although men are more likely to report they experience harassment on the Internet (44 percent of men compared to 37 percent of women), as a general rule, more women have been targeted on social media sites (73 percent women vs. 27% men). Women also tend to face the most severe types of harassment, like stalking and sexual harassment, while men generally face milder issues like name-calling and public embarrassment. Young women are the most likely to experience this severe targeting, with a quarter of women between the ages of 18 and 24 reporting having been stalked or sexually harassed online. Furthermore, the representation and coverage of the matter in the newspapers is certainly very biased. In He Said, She Said, Let’s Hear What the Data Say: Sexual Harassment in the Media, Courts, EEOC, and Social Science, Joni Hersch & Beverly Moran explore the coverage of sexual harassment in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal and whether it is consistent with sexual harassment as it is reported in three other sources: a 1994 United States Merit Systems Protection Board (USMSPB) survey, charges filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) from 2006-2010, and complaints filed in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (EDPa) from 2010-2011. The review of the media coverage suggests that sexual harassment is covered in an intensely local and episodic manner, with little recognition that sexual harassment is a national phenomenon that could be connected to “a larger, social, economic or political trend.” (P. 778.) In comparing the media coverage and the data sets, the authors found that while the reporting of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal generally does not mislead regarding the demographics of sexual harassment claimants, particular stories may downplay the seriousness of the factual allegations made in complaints. The article suggests that differences between the media portrayal of sexual harassment and what can be found in the data may result from the media’s focus on litigation. The authors note that a focus on pre-litigation harassment claims may provide a fuller picture of sexual harassment. The authors end the article observing that the focus on litigation leads to reporting that tends to miss “a sense of what happens before litigation and what sexual harassment means to victims in terms of their economic, professional, and emotional lives.” (P. 781.)

One’s view of sexual harassment can be highly variable depending on their position as it relates. The victim, vs. the perpetrator, vs. the organization vs. the human resources don’t necessarily experience the matter the same nor do they have the same outcomes in mind although they should. Regardless as a work life advocate, we suggest a No Tolerance policy with specificity and clarity in describing anti-harassment policies and procedures. The following information from the EEOC will serve your organization well: http://www.eeoc.gov/federal/model_eeo_programs.cfm#possible

Management Monday: How to Manage the Speaker Hiring Process

A great speaker should ignite in their audience a feeling like they’re on The Amazing Race. Their hearts should be pumping, eyes wide and spirits ready to tackle the challenge that’s been presented before them. Bringing in a speaker is a means to not only provide important information in a specific area, be it leadership or work life balance; it is a chance to elicit investment from the audience in the given topic. But, it’s an overwhelming process to track down and hire a speaker that’s a good fit. Below are some tips to consider when locating the right presenter for an event.

Quick Tips for Hiring an Event Speaker:

1)      Have a clear idea of the company’s goal in hiring a speaker and locate specialized talent. If the goal is to help employees improve office communications, hiring a speaker who specializes in communication skills will be more effective than bringing in a big-name speaker, like Sheryl Sandberg, who specializes in women’s professional issues.

2)      Make the call for speakers clear and specific. When putting out the call, publish a description of the event in mind and state the goal. Make sure to list the materials the speaker should submit, such as a short proposal, sample presentation videos (or links), past events list, testimonials and fees. This helps to filter out less interested candidates and simplifies the screening process.

3)      Remember during the process that candidates have expectations as well. Tailoring events to be keynote and speaker friendly helps to reel in stronger candidates. Price compensation competitively. Also, Professional Speaking Coach, Dr. Nick Morgan, suggests not to force speakers to compete with food by scheduling during meal times. In addition, he says to avoid insisting speakers modify their slides or graphics for the particular event and avoid demanding to see the slides before the presentation (Forbes). These are common mistakes that can cause a candidate to fall-through or not return in the future.

 Farnaz4

The right speaker can provide up-to-date industry knowledge, pull the audience into the topic and ignite growth. And although there can be bumps along the way, the speaker hiring process isn’t as big and scary as it seems. After all, as Zig Ziglar said “You can succeed at almost anything for which you have unbridled enthusiasm.”

 

 

Related Reads:

What Martin Luther King Would Tell a Public Speaker
Workshop and Seminar Topics
Speaker Formats Breakdown

 

This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

 

 

Though the unemployment rate is holding near a five year low of 6.7%, Reuters reported job growth averaged about 195,000 per month in February and March (NBC). This is great news for organizations in need of more human capital and for job seekers. Or it’s bad news if companies aren’t strategic in their hiring procedures. Poor hiring decisions equate to high turnover down the road. In Turnover: The Real Bottom-Line, Dr. Sami M. Abbasi and Dr. Kenneth W. Hollman explain that turnover is one of the most significant causes of declining morale and poor productivity in the United States. However, when done correctly, hiring the right employees can lead to low turnover, a best places to work ranking and a successful bottom-line.

credit net efekt

 

What are some consequences of poor hiring?

Sapped leadership and management energy
Lower productivity
Diminished employee morale
Financial costs in unearned compensation
Turnover cost when employees leave

What leads to hiring success?

Many factors play a role, but one commonly overlooked aspect of hiring is emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is proven to have a direct impact on the success of employees. This is why employers are wise to consider emotional intelligence and utilize behavioral interview questions.

Considerations of Hiring with EI:

 

Related Reads:

Employee Selection Training

True Detective of Candidate Rejection

Turnover: The Real Bottom-Line

 

 

This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

Management Monday: Managing Rejection


Credit Cleveland Bar Association

Most Human Resources professionals know that no matter how poorly written a resume or how badly spoken a candidate, it is never appropriate during the employee selection process to treat a candidate with anything less than respect. Unfortunately, employers don’t always stick to that sensible rule when rejecting candidates. In fact, Job Bank Founder, Kelly Blazek, recently made national headlines for sending a nasty email response to a job-seeker’s Linkedin invitation (NBC News). Blazek’s reaction was surprising and alarming for many reasons, not the least of which is that many job- strategists encourage candidates to connect with professionals and job-seekers on Linkedin. Blazek’s response is visible below.

 

Unprofessional-LinkedIn-Response

 

Kelly Blazek’s Letter Above (Source)

 

Almost as baffling as the popular TV Show, True Detective, the employee selection world is anything but easy. From behavioral interviews to goal alignment, it is crucial to filter out the best candidates, but it is equally important to uphold company reputation by treating all perspective candidates with respect. So, be it a traditional application, Linkedin invitation, a Facebook request, a phone call or an office walk-in, below are some guidelines for dealing with candidate rejections.

Tips for Rejecting Job Applicants

1)      If they have sought you out via Social Media, you are perfectly warranted in ignoring their friendship request. However, it is wise to respond with a friendly email or message containing a link to the online application link.

2)      Set up an automatic reply system for online applications that sends applicants an email response confirmation that their application has been received and that a representative will be in touch if anything further is needed.

3)      When a rejection letter is warranted, be considerate and end on a positive note.

4)      If the candidate is a good fit for the company, but not the specific job, encourage them to apply for a better suited position or to apply again in the future.

5)      If an applicant has followed up on their application status and especially if they have come in for an interview, it is common courtesy to not only send a rejection letter, but to call and kindly notify them that the position has been filled.

These tips may seem obvious, but Kelly Blazek proved that not to be true. We all make errors in judgment, just as Kelly did. But practicing emotional intelligence and being thoughtful about each interaction reduces chances of error.

 

Photo Credit: Cleveland Bar Association

 

Related Reads:
Behavioral Interview Questions
Employee Selection Services
Can I Get a Big Mac With a Side of Succession Planning?

 

 

This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

 

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

Management Monday: Managing Succession Planning

McDonalds Public DomainMcDonalds may not be the business to ask about healthy eating habits, but they do know something about succession planning. They have come to understand the costs and mayhem that are repercussions of losing key roles in the organization. It is thanks to their succession development process that the sudden death of CEO Jim Cantalupo in 2004 did not leave the company shipwrecked without a captain. Charlie Bell, a leader from within the company was prepared to step into the CEO role right away, keeping the company on track. And even when he was tragically diagnosed with terminal cancer and resigned only eight months later, the company was equipped for the emergency with Jim Skinner ready to take charge. Had McDonalds not been prepared with a plan B and plan C, where would they be?

92% of organizations recognize that not having a plan is risky. Despite the proven success of succession plans at leading Fortune 500 companies, such as McDonalds and LL Bean, many companies still don’t have a plan in place.

What Prevents Companies from Creating Succession Plans?

1)      Not knowing succession planning is a viable option

2)      Board failing to prioritize succession

3)      Fear of budget limitation

4)      Failure to execute a plan correctly

5)      Neglecting succession training or resources

6)      Lack of time to put the plan in place

succession-planning-tips

 

Most of these obstacles are misunderstood or easily resolved. For example, the cost of hiring professionals to help develop an effective succession plan is far less than the cost of suffering from losing a CEO every five months. Below are some tips for organization’s to consider when it comes to succession planning.

 

3 Tips for Organizational Succession Planning:

  1. Recruit candidates whose goals align with company mission
  2. Foster leadership values in work culture
  3. Reward leaders and ensure they feel valued
  4. Never rush prospective leaders into their roles
  5. Outline clear policies and procedures for the succession process
  6. Consider having a back-up employee (or two) for every key company role at all times

 

Companies can implement these tactics with the help of expert internal Human Resources employees, or outside succession professionals. A good succession plan will leave every organization saying “I’m lovin’ it.”

 

This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

 

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

 

 

 

 

 

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