Posts Tagged ‘Emotional Intelligence’

No matter how resolute one becomes to strengthening their own emotional intelligence level, the fact remains that people around them aren’t necessarily emotionally intelligent. For that matter, even when aware of the emotional intelligence concept, people don’t always want to grow. That leaves an emotionally intelligent individual on an island in a low emotional intelligence ocean. It can be stressful, but it doesn’t have to be a drowning experience. A key value of emotional intelligence is its infectious nature. The tips below can help anyone who feels alone and disheartened on the island find hope.

 

Credit banspy, flickr, no editing

 

 

How to Deal with Low EI in others

Ride it out
In every workplace, in every family, in every group of friends, there are varying levels of emotional intelligence. For someone who has high emotional intelligence, it can be difficult to understand the thoughts and behaviors of those with lower EI. At the same time, it is important to remember that everyone is always growing as a person, and everyone has shown displays of low EI at some point. No one is above it. What does that mean? It means if individuals continue to show high emotional intelligence traits to others through example, others will also eventually learn.

Discuss it
Most times; an individual won’t react well to being told they have low emotional intelligence and poor people skills. Igniting growth has to be gradual and tactful. How can change be encouraged? When someone with low EI says “I just don’t know how she can stay so calm!” An appropriate response may be “I think she is probably taking a few minutes to digest the situation before going forward. That’s probably a good idea.” This kind of statement is not accusatory or authoritative but suggests a positive line of thinking.

Avoid it
It wouldn’t be realistic to ignore that sometimes situations are just out of hand. A really insensitive boss who won’t change despite staff efforts to combat the behavior or a friend who doesn’t really act like a friend and drags other people down can be very stressful. There are times like those when it may make sense to look for a new job or distance that friendship. However, the avoidance measure should probably be saved for last. In most cases, patience and/or discussion pays off.

Tackle it

If a person is aware they struggle with relationships and their emotions, they can seek training to help. Emotional intelligence training is a good solution to offer a friend or employee who feels like they can’t quite understand their emotions or be intuitive in relationships.

 

To sum it up, dealing with people that have low EI essentially involves combating their behavior with high EI. As Daniel Goleman said “In a very real sense we have two minds, one that thinks and one that feels” (Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ). The trick is learning to understand the side that feels and teaching others to do the same.

Photo Credit: Bannspy via Flickr

 

 

Related Reads:

Spoonful of Sugar Positive Thinking Tips
What is Emotional Intelligence?
Catching Fire on the Job: Dealing with a Challenging Boss
Emotional Intelligence of a Clown Fish

 

This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

 

Management Monday: Emotionally Intelligent Leadership

Actions speak louder than words. The most impactful way to inspire emotional intelligence in a team or group is to lead by example. In X-Men Days of Future Past, Professor Xavier is able to influence a friend to make a good decision and spare lives. It is the professor’s patience and empathy to his friend, more than his words that ignite change. Below are some tips to become a more emotionally intelligent leader.

 

Dells Official Flickr Page - man in group

 

 

5 Tips for Leading with Emotional Intelligence

1)      Listen first, talk later

It isn’t possible to internalize what someone else is saying, if one doesn’t let them say it all and listen intently. This doesn’t mean forming opinions as they talk, this means quietly listening so the mind can understand each concept conveyed. This isn’t as easy as it sounds, because often people jump from topic to topic or need several attempts to convey a message. In essence, it takes patience to do this well, but it is worth the effort.

2)      Pay attention to signals

Be able to notice and understand verbal and physical signals. This is a big part of emotional intelligence for leaders. Look for body language queues and underlying emotions.

3)      Think, think, think
Take time to process facts, ideas and information you gather from others or within yourself. The first sign of emotional intelligence is being able to stay calm and take time before acting. Always make a habit of letting things sink in before acting or commenting.

4)      Self-Evaluate

This means taking time to understand what you feel, because that is the only way to know how you perceive a situation and move forward confidently.

5)      Be considerate

Having internalized and processed both your own feelings and those of others make decisions taking everyone’s perspective into account.

 

As Henry Ford said “If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle, as well as your own.” How else would it be possible to achieve a common important goal, while also helping others to achieve their personal goals in the process?

Photo Credit: Dell’s Official Flickr Page

 

Related Reads:

Leadership Qualities of Steve Jobs
Emerging Leaders Introduction
Leadership Programs and Assessments
Leadership Qualities of Jo Rowling 
Employee Engagement Test
Leadership Qualities of Henry Ford

 

This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

 

There are many values visible in the life of Henry Ford that enabled him to be a highly successful business leader. However, it seems that his value of employees, belief in equality and emotional intelligence truly set him apart from others. Henry Ford’s leadership qualities enabled him to change the trajectory of workplace practices.

Henry_ford_1919 Wikimedia commons public domain3 Leadership Qualities of Henry Ford:

1) He valued human capital

Ford set a terrific example for valuing human capital. Though it was a shock to Wall Street, he increased worker’s wages to five dollars a day and instituted an eight-hour workday. He recognized that increasing wages and offering reasonable hours would serve to retain and motivate employees. “Because Ford had lowered his costs per car, the high wages didn’t matter – except for making it feasible for more people to buy cars” (Iacocca , Inc). Henry Ford even said “There is one rule for the industrialist and that is: make the best quality goods possible at the lowest cost possible, paying the highest wages possible” (Forbes).

2) He believed in equality

Henry Ford’s business decisions in the realm of diversity were a catalyst for the growth of equality in the workplace. He offered employment to women, African Americans, and disabled individuals long before most other businesses did so (Forbes). In 1916, Ford employed individuals representing 62 different nationalities. At that time, the company also employed over 900 people with disabilities. Through the years, Ford went on to set standards of non-discrimination and equalize opportunities in many ways (Ford).

3) He was emotionally intelligent

Before the term emotionally intelligent was even coined, Henry Ford appeared to embody this quality. His ability to understand that saving clients money made them feel more valued was a sure sign of emotional intelligence. He was sensitive to economic needs and took action to respond to customers in ways that showed he cared. Similarly, he was in-tune with the financial and work life balance needs of employees. Because he hoped to show appreciation and understanding toward them, he implemented positive wage and shift changes. Ford even said “If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle, as well as your own.”

Like many leaders, Henry Ford broke away from standards. He was the fish that ventured away from its school and tried something different. He was also keenly in touch with people’s needs, which enabled him to know how to help them and in turn run a successful business.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain) 

 

 

Related Reads:

Hermione: Leadership or Management?
Leadership Programs and Assessments
Why Your Company Needs to Hire Leaders
Emerging Leaders: The Official Leadership Style Guide
Mark Zuckerberg’s Leadership Qualities

This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

Dr. Farnaz Namin’s children’s book, The Ocean’s Riddle, recently became an Amazon Best-Seller.

Center for Work Life happily extends congratulations!

 

cover-image-bestsell
amazo buy

 

The Ocean’s Riddle is a story that embodies some of Center for Work Life’s primary values. The book offers a great example of work life balance which can be seen in the mother’s time spent with her child. Beyond work life balance, the concept of emotional intelligence is important to the characters as they interact and grow to understand each other better. Though fun, engaging and colorful for children, this book also offers important lessons for children and adults. It is vital to never lose sight of one’s values. Congratulations again to Dr. Farnaz for a job well done.

 

The Ocean’s Riddle:

This is the only tale of perseverance ever told by a courageous oyster from under the sea.  A young boy makes a new friend who tells him a story about bravery. Set in a beautiful ocean world, the lesson learned is one he’ll never forget.

What a delightful way to teach children ways to overcome challenges and foster perseverance. Dr. Namin’s gentle message will likely resonate in the ears and minds of children as they read and reread “The Ocean’s Riddle” for years to come. A great addition to any parent, teacher or counselor’s library.

~ Kim Taylor 
First Grade Teacher 

 

 

Currently only available in English. 
Recommended for Ages 1-8. 
Look for it soon in board back form.

 

 

About the Author:

Farnaz Namin, Ph.D., is a doctor of psychology and the Principal at Center for Work Life. She has more than 15 years of psychology practice experience within the US and abroad. She is the constant catalyst to change as the Florida Key Psychologist, representing state and federal work-force regulatory planning and legislature.  She was the 2013 honoree of the OBJ Women Who Mean Business, and is regularly sought as an expert speaker, speaking on complex topics such as employment, talent acquisition, leadership development, and team effectiveness.  Because of her vast experience in corporate and government environments, she is able to bring a fresh, unique and research driven perspective in her dynamic and groundbreaking workshops and seminars.  She is a regular guest expert on media networks such as FOX, HLN, and scientific publications for trade and professional magazines, such as the Huffington Post, Boston Herald, and The New York Post.

Click here to read more about Dr. Farnaz Namin…

 

The Ocean’s Riddle on Amazon
(Ebook and Paperback)
Champions Publishing

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This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

 

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

 

Though the unemployment rate is holding near a five year low of 6.7%, Reuters reported job growth averaged about 195,000 per month in February and March (NBC). This is great news for organizations in need of more human capital and for job seekers. Or it’s bad news if companies aren’t strategic in their hiring procedures. Poor hiring decisions equate to high turnover down the road. In Turnover: The Real Bottom-Line, Dr. Sami M. Abbasi and Dr. Kenneth W. Hollman explain that turnover is one of the most significant causes of declining morale and poor productivity in the United States. However, when done correctly, hiring the right employees can lead to low turnover, a best places to work ranking and a successful bottom-line.

credit net efekt

 

What are some consequences of poor hiring?

Sapped leadership and management energy
Lower productivity
Diminished employee morale
Financial costs in unearned compensation
Turnover cost when employees leave

What leads to hiring success?

Many factors play a role, but one commonly overlooked aspect of hiring is emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is proven to have a direct impact on the success of employees. This is why employers are wise to consider emotional intelligence and utilize behavioral interview questions.

Considerations of Hiring with EI:

 

Related Reads:

Employee Selection Training

True Detective of Candidate Rejection

Turnover: The Real Bottom-Line

 

 

This Blog has been featured by the West Orange Chamber of Commerce. Sources such as HLN have also been home to publications by Dr. Farnaz Namin-Hedayati and she has been cited by the Orlando Business Journal

Center for Work Life of Orlando, Florida is an award-winning executive development firm providing leadership and management training to executives and organizations. Our main services include executive coachingleadership developmentexecutive succession planningemotional intelligence trainingcareer planningstaff development, and communication in the workplace.

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